System Requirements

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Windows Operating System
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Safari (latest tested version 11.0)
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Registration for Data Workshop

1. Go to Data Workshop. Click “Join”.
2. Fill in the information and click "Join".
3. Check your registered email account for an email with subject “Data Workshop: Account confirmation” and click the confirmation link.
4. Return to Data Workshop to log in.

Working with data: Raw Data

Click on “Workbench” on the top menu.

Go to "File" > "New Table".

Enter your desired Column Name and then choose the data type for this variable (Number, Category, Pattern, or Text). You will not be able to change the variable type once you have created the column. To go back at any time during this process, press the “Cancel” button.

Variable data type






Number
This option lets you enter a real number precise from 0 to 10 decimal places to the right of the decimal point. It can be represented simply as a number or as a percent. The precision is often determined by the accuracy of a tool used in a measurement. A number may also be money in U.S. dollars (USD).

Category
This option lets you enter a set of from 2 to 12 values of your choice. Each value can be up to 15 characters long (letters and/or numbers). Data Workshop asks you to define these when defining the variable so that they are chosen from a list rather than typed when you enter them in the table. This minimizes mistakes when entering data.

Generated
You can generate either an Iterative Sequence or a list of Random Integers.

  • Define an Iterative Sequence by entering a real number Start Term, a linear rule for generating the NEXT term from the NOW term by multiplying and/or adding values, and the Number of Terms in the sequence. For example, if Start Term = 3 and NEXT = 2 * NOW + 1 for 5 terms you get the sequence 3, 7, 15, 31, 63.

  • Define a set of Random Integers between and including the Lower Bound and Upper Bound. You also choose the Number of Terms in the set. For example, to simulate rolling a 6-sided die 10 times you could enter Lower Bound = 1, Upper Bound = 6, and Number of Terms = 10.

Text
This option lets you enter up to 20 characters of text in a table cell. Mostly this is used to label rows. Note that no statistical analysis or graphs can be made from a text variable, so if you want to study category data, for example, don’t enter it as text.

Formula
Once you have defined a Number variable you can select the column header (or any other column header) and choose Table > Insert to define a new Formula variable. Data Workshop helps you avoid mistakes by giving you a set of buttons to click instead of typing. These buttons include numbers, arithmetic operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide, power, and parentheses), a few calculator functions (absolute value, square root, powers of 10 and base-10 logarithms, and powers of e and natural logarithms), and a decimal, backspace, and all clear (AC).

There is also a drop-down list of all the available Number columns to use as variables in your formula.

Note: The first column in a Table cannot be a Formula because this data type must refer to an existing column or columns in the formula definition.

File menu
New column creation
File menu
Category column definition
File menu
Iterative Sequence
Random Integers
File menu
Text column definition
File menu
Formula column definition
Formula open column definition
Click on "Table" to see the menu.

The default number of rows is 10. You can add or delete rows by first selecting the intended row(s), then go to “Table" > "Insert...” menu. For convenience, you can add rows by selecting the last line (line 10 in the example) and hit return/enter button on your keyboard.

At this time, the maximum number of possible columns in a Table is 26. To change a column name, select the column by clicking on the letter (e.g., “A” or “B”), then go to “Table” > “Edit”. You can also sort a column, delete it, or add additional columns by first selecting the column then go to "Table" menu and choose appropriate action.

You can edit the Table description by clicking on “Table name…”.

Table menu
To save a Table for later use, go to “File" > "Save...”. The Table will be saved in “dtf” format on your personal (‘My Files’) or shared (‘Shared’) folder under your account. If you save the file in the personal folder, the file is private to you and no other users could view or modify it. If you save it in your shared folder, other users would be able to view it but not modify it.

Go to “File” > “Open” and select any stored Tables.

If you want to print any of these Tables or Graphs, click on “Options” at the bottom of the window or go to “File” > “Print”.

File menu
Save to
Click the Red square to minimize a Table or Graph.

To retrieve any object, scroll to the bottom of the page and select it.

Click the Red × to close a Table or Graph.

Note: Only data tables can be saved.
Amusement Park Table
Figure 1: Top 15 Amusement Parks in North America with parent companies, locations, and 2010-2012 Attendance. Data taken from TuvaLabs; originally from Global Attractions Attendance Report.

Analyzing data

Analyze a Single Column
Once you have a Table with at least one column, you can start analyzing the data. Select the data by clicking on the letter above the column of interest (e.g., “A” or “B”). Click the “Statistics” menu button and choose one of the available options.
Note: Options that are not available for a selected column are grayed out in menus.

Single number analysis





Single category analysis


Frequency Table
The data is divided into frequency bins, and the counts and percentages for each bin are provided. On the right side, you can control the minimum and maximum values as well as the bin size.
Amusement Park Frequency Table
2012 Attendance Frequency Table (Data from Figure 1)

Analyze a Pair of Columns
If you select two number columns, you can still produce Frequency Tables and Landmarks. You will get separate Tables and Graphs for each column.

Number-number relationships



Category-category relationships
Specific other Graphs are suggested depending on the variable types.

Scatterplot
If you want to study the relationship between the two columns of number variables, choose “Graph” > “Scatterplot”. This produces a scatterplot of the two columns. There are many features that can be configured on the right side of the plot. By default, the first column you select will be represented on the x-axis and the second column you select will be on the y-axis.
You can study linear relationships between the columns by either fitting a line by eye (click the “Manual” box and drag to place your line), or having the workbench calculate and plot a regression line (click the Linear” box). Clicking “Correlation” displays the Pearson Product-Moment correlation between the columns.
Scatterplot
2011 Attendance vs. 2012 Attendance (Data from Figure 1)

Working with data: Simulations

Click on “Simulations” on the top menu or within the Workbench. Each simulation includes a customizable setup. Appropriate graphs and tables are created once the simulation is run. Currently, there are 8 simulations:

Simulations Page
Click Setup to design an experiment where one or two circular spinners are spun. Each spinner has from 2 to 12 sections (sectors), and each sector is by default the same size (includes the same percent of total circle area). You can change the size of a sector by changing its percent of the circle area in the Percent setup box. When your setup is complete click Spin Once to simulate one spin or Spin from 2 to 10,000 times. Whether your outcome is to spin once or spin several times, the results table and graph for previous spins are cleared each time you click one of the buttons. Check “Accumulate Results” to add new spins to the ones you have already done; in this way you can display results of your spinner setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.
Spinners
Click Setup to design an experiment where 1 or more (up to 100) coins are flipped. The coins may be fair coins (each with a 50 percent chance of landing heads) or loaded coins (each with the same percent chance of landing heads, from 0% to 100%). You may also let the computer randomly assign a chance of heads to the coins. The default setup is to flip 10 fair coins. When your setup is complete click Flip Once to simulate one flip or Flip from 2 to 10,000 times. Whether your outcome is to flip once or flip several times, the results table and graph for previous flips are cleared each time you click one of the buttons. Check “Accumulate Results” to add new flips to the ones you have already done; in this way you can display results of your coin-flip setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.
Coin Flip
Click Setup to design an experiment where 1 or 2 regular polyhedral dice are tossed. Each die has 4, 6, 8, or 12 sides (tetrahedras, cubes, octahedras, or dodecahedras, respectively). The default setup is to flip one 6-sided die. When your setup is complete click Toss Once to simulate one toss or Toss from 2 to 10,000 times. Whether you toss once or toss several times, the results table and graph for previous tosses are cleared each time you click one of the buttons. Check “Accumulate Results” to add new tosses to the ones you have already done; in this way you can display results of your dice-tossing setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.
Dice Toss

Click Setup to design an experiment where a block is drawn from a bag containing 2 or more (up to 10,000) colored blocks. There are two versions of the simulation: Basic and Draw-Until.

  • Basic Version: You may use 2 to 5 different colors for the blocks and put from 2 to 10,000 blocks in the bag. You may have the colors randomly assigned to the blocks or enter the number of blocks for each color. If you enter the number of blocks for each color, the sum of these numbers must equal your entered Number of Blocks – successful assignment shows a green Total in the setup window, while a red Total means that you haven’t correctly assigned numbers to colors. If you leave the “Don’t replace blocks” box unchecked the simulation replaces a block after it is drawn and the color is tallied. When your setup is complete click Draw Once to simulate one draw or Draw from 2 to 10,000 times. If you check “Don’t replace blocks” the bag has one less block after each draw and may eventually become empty. You will be alerted if and when this is the case. The default simulation is the Basic version with 25 total blocks with 5 randomly assigned colors drawn without replacement.
  • Draw‐Until Version: The total Number of Blocks and how they are colored are set up the same way as for the Basic Version of the simulation. You then have two choices: (1) Draw until you get a certain number of blocks all the same color (for example, 5 red) or (2) Draw until you have at least a certain number of each color block (for example, at least 5 red and at least 3 blue). If you leave the “Don’t replace blocks” box unchecked the simulation replaces a block after it is drawn and the color is tallied. When your setup is complete click “Draw until” to run the simulation. If you check “Don’t replace blocks” the bag has one less block after each draw and you can see how many blocks remain in the bag after the draw‐until conditions are met.

In both versions of Blocks in a Bag:

  • Whether your outcome is to draw once, draw several times, or draw until, the results table and graph for previous draws are cleared each time you click one of the buttons.
  • Check “Accumulate Results” to add new draws to the ones you have already done. In this way you can display results of your block-drawing setup indefinitely or until the bag is empty.
  • Check “Show Number of Blocks of Each Color" to see the current collection of blocks in the bag. The default is not to show the colors because the most common use of the experiment is to use the data from drawing to estimate how many of each color are hidden from view in the bag.
  • Note that the frequency table and graph windows give you options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.
Blocks in a bag

In this simulation, 2 target points are chosen on a number line – one to the left of a starting point (0) and one to the right. You begin by taking one step, left or right, from the starting point, then continue taking steps from there. The chances of moving left or right for each step taken are given in the setup. The question you explore is: “How many steps does it take to reach one of the target points?”

Click Setup to drag the left (negative) and right (positive) target points from the starting point (0). Do this by dragging the points on the number line. The maximum number of steps in either direction is 10, but the targets don’t have to be the same distance from 0.

Then set the chances of moving left or right for each step taken by picking one of 3 options:

  • “Steps have the same chance to move left or right” means there is a 50 percent chance each of going left or right.
  • “Steps have random chances of moving left or right” means the computer randomly picks a whole-number P percent between 0% and 100% for left, and then assigns 100 – P percent for right. For example, if it picks 13 percent chance to move left, then there is a 100 – 13 = 87 percent chance to move right.
  • “Assign your own chances of moving left or right” lets you assign specific chances for moving left and right. Note that the sum of the two chances must be 100%, highlighted by a green 100 Total in the setup window.

When your setup is complete click Walk Once to simulate one random walk or Walk from 2 to 10,000 times. Check “Animation” to see the point step along the number line. Click “Show chance of moves” to see the set chances of moving right or left for each step taken.

Whether your outcome is to walk once or walk several times, the results table and graph for previous walks are cleared each time you click one of the buttons. Check “Accumulate Results” to add new walks to the ones you have already done; in this way you can display results of your random-walk setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.

Random Walk

The Estimate Area simulation lets you use randomness and the power of a computer to estimate areas of figures drawn on screen instead of counting squares or using area formulas. The idea is to drop many tiny dots on the drawing and tally the colors they land on. The percent of dots that land on each color is an estimate of the percent of the whole drawing area that has that color. To help you understand the idea, the whole drawing area includes 10 × 10 = 100 smaller squares, so each smaller square you color is 1 percent of the total. For example, in the drawing at right, there are 2 small gray squares so they make up 2 percent of the whole drawing area.

To run a simulation, click on any of the 5 colors to set your “paintbrush” and draw. You can draw over any color with any other color to fix mistakes or edit your drawing. Click Show Grid if that helps you place parts of your drawing. When you are finished drawing, click Drop Once to drop the first random blue dot. (Look carefully, they are tiny.) Of course, the idea is to drop many, many dots – the more you drop the better the area estimate. So you can also set it to Drop 2 to 10,000 dots at a time. Click Clear to remove the dropped dots from your drawing. Click Erase Paint to clear your drawing.

The next illustration shows the results of dropping 500 dots on the drawing. Note that in this run, the estimate of gray in the drawing is 1 percent. The estimate of brown in the drawing is 13 percent. Count small colored squares or click Show Color Percents to see the actual percents of colors in the drawing.

Whether your outcome is to drop once or drop several times, the results table and graph are cleared each time you click one of the buttons. Check “Accumulate Results” to drop new dots on top of the ones you already have; in this way you can display results of your area estimation setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.

Estimate Area
Estimate Area

Manfred Eigen is a chemist and physicist who studies, among other things, how populations grow while individuals live and die. An indifferent strategy model for growth is one in which the birth or death of an individual is independent of the current state of the population. (Compare this to the equilibrium growth model described in another simulation.) The Indifferent Strategy simulation lets you examine the long-term results of this model.

You start with a simplified population represented by 2-sided blue/yellow markers filling a square game board. Click Setup to define the population by choosing the size of the game board (population) – from 2 × 2 to 10 × 10 squares. You can then decide how many blue and how many yellow markers are in the starting population. Note that the total number of markers must be equal to the number of squares on the board. The default setup is a 4 × 4 board with 8 blue and 8 yellow randomly placed markers.

When your setup is complete click Flip Once to flip a single marker. The simulation starts by flipping a coin. If the result is a Head, a randomly chosen blue marker is flipped to blue. If the result is a Tail, a randomly chosen yellow marker is flipped to blue. The flip is ignored if there are no markers that match the flip. You might think of flipping from yellow to blue as a birth and flipping from blue to yellow as a death – so a Head means a death, and a Tail means a birth.

You might find it helpful to think of 1 flip as 1 generation of the population. Whether you Flip Once or Flip 2 to 10,000 times you will see the tally of different numbers of blue markers on the board over that number of generations. You may need to scroll down the frequency table to see some results.

The question is, “Under the indifferent strategy model for any given starting population is there a predictable number of live members of the population in the long run?” In terms of blue/yellow markers, “For any number of blue markers in the starting board, is there a predictable number of blue markers after many flips?” “Does it matter where the markers are on the board?” What do you think?

Whether your outcome is to flip once or flip several times, the results table and graph are cleared each time you click one of the buttons, but the next flip or flips will begin with the current board. Click Clear to start over with a random new board with your setup; this also clears the results table and graph. Check “Accumulate Results” to add new flips to the ones you have already done; in this way you can display results of your indifferent strategy setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.

Indifferent Strategy

Manfred Eigen is a chemist and physicist who studies, among other things, how populations grow while individuals live and die. An equilibrium model for growth is one in which the birth or death of an individual depends on the current state of the population. (Compare this to the indifferent strategy model described in another simulation.) The Equilibrium simulation lets you examine the long-term results of this model.

You start with a simplified population represented by 2-sided blue/yellow markers filling a square game board. Click Setup to define the population by choosing the size of the game board (population) – from 2 × 2 to 10 × 10 squares. You can then decide how many blue and how many yellow markers are in the starting population. Note that the total number of markers must be equal to the number of squares on the board. The default setup is a 4 × 4 board with 8 blue and 8 yellow randomly placed markers.

When your setup is complete click Flip Once to flip a single random marker. In this simulation, a specific marker (member of the population) is picked at random and then flipped – if it is alive (blue) it dies (flips to yellow), and if it is not alive (yellow) it is born (flips to blue). (The computer picks a random row and a random column in the game board to pick the specific marker.)

You might find it helpful to think of 1 flip as 1 generation of the population. Whether you Flip Once or Flip 2 to 10,000 times you will see the tally of different numbers of blue markers on the board over that number of generations. You may need to scroll the frequency table and graph to see more data. The question is, “Under an equilibrium model, for any given starting population is there a predictable number of live members of the population in the long run?” In terms of blue/yellow markers, “For any number of blue markers on the starting board, is there a predictable number of blue markers after many flips?” “Does it matter where the markers are on the board?” What do you think?

Whether your outcome is to flip once or flip several times, the results table and graph are cleared each time you click one of the buttons, but the next flip or flips will begin with the current board. Click Clear to start over with a random new board with your setup; this also clears the results table and graph. Check “Accumulate Results” to add new flips to the ones you have already done; in this way you can display results of your indifferent strategy setup indefinitely. Note that within the frequency table and graph windows you have options for other graphs and display formatting like those described earlier in this Help document.

Equilibrium

Working with data: Surveys

Click on “My Surveys”. This will show you all of your existing surveys.
My Surveys Page
New Survey: Click “Create new survey”. Fill out the Title, Welcome message, End message, Description, and Notes (optional). Once you fill this out, you will see this screen:
New Survey
Adding Headings/Questions: Drag over the other heading and different question types from the left to the right. Heading: There are two text sizes for options. Text question: Choose between short form and paragraph questions. Numeric question: You can set the number of decimal places, set the number to a percentage or to currency (USD). Multiple choice question: There are three types of multiple choice questions: radio, dropdown, or checkbox. Click the plus button to add in more answer choices. For all questions, you have the option to add in help text. Rearrange questions: Drag the up and down arrows. Delete questions: Click on the trashcan. Do the same for answer choices for multiple choice questions. Note: All of your changes will be saved automatically as you make them.
Initial Survey Screen Survey with questions
Below is an example of a survey on the response page.
Analysis in Workbench: On the responses page, you can click a button to view the data in the Workbench. Note that text responses will not be viewed in Workbench. A survey without any responses will also not be viewable in the Workbench.
Survey Responses
Sharing your template: This allows other people to view and clone your survey. Responding: “anyone can respond” — any one with the URL to the survey can respond. “Invitation only” — only those invited by email can respond to your survey. Responses: You can see all of the existing responses to your survey.
Privacy Settings
You can view all shared surveys. Users can choose to share the survey template (if the clone button is active) or the responses.
Shared Surveys

My Files and Shared Files

You can view all of your files under My Files. Under Actions, you can rename files and open tables in the Workbench.
My Files
You can place files in your Shared files to let other users view your files.
Under the Actions menu, you can Download a file to your computer, Open a file in the Workbench (if it's a DTF table), delete it, or rename it.
Shared Files